Skills assessments—helping you fit into the Australian labour market

Did you know that Australia is the only country in the world that has a pre-migration skills assessment scheme?

A skills assessment helps you find out if you have the necessary skills and qualifications to work in your nominated occupation in Australia.

The skills assessment scheme has achieved encouraging results for skilled migrants in the Australian labour market. The Continuous Survey of Australia’s Migrants shows that more than 90 per cent of offshore skilled migrants who migrate with a satisfactory skills assessment are in skilled employment within six months of arriving in Australia.

If you want to apply for an Australian points tested skilled migration visa, you will need to submit an expression of interest (EOI) in SkillSelect and be invited to apply for a visa.

Before you submit an EOI, you will have to obtain a satisfactory skills assessment from the relevant assessing authority for your nominated occupation. The Skilled Occupation List provides a complete list of the relevant assessing authority for each occupation on the list, as well as contact details for these authorities.

You should undertake a skills assessment before you submit your EOI so that you don’t spend your time and money on a visa application that may not meet the necessary requirements.

A skills assessment should not be confused with licensing or registration. A skills assessment helps you to determine whether your skills and experience is relevant to Australian standards in your nominated occupation while registration or licensing means you hold a license or registration and have permission from the relevant authority to practise in Australia.

If you wish to apply for an employer sponsored visa, you will need to provide evidence of Australian registration or licensing of your occupation to prove that you are eligible. For example, to work as a plumber in Australia, you must be registered with or obtain a licence from a local authority in the state or territory where you want to practise as a plumber. In some cases, a successful skills assessment is also required in addition to meeting the licensing and registration requirements.

You can check if your occupation requires registration or licensing by visiting the Australian skills recognition information page and selecting your occupation. The department does not give advice about skills assessments or registration and licensing requirements.  We process visa applications according to the information and documents you provide.

For information about skills assessments, contact the relevant assessing authority. For questions relating to licensing and registration, contact the relevant registration body in your state or territory.

More information about the skills assessment process is available on the department’s website.

11 thoughts on “Skills assessments—helping you fit into the Australian labour market

  1. Hi there
    This is harry I got a question if I have got 4 and half year experienc m I eligible for visa 457 as ma employer wanna sponser me for 457 visa I have got overseas experience as well but dat company does not exist any more and now I have got only 4.5 years Australian experience
    Thanx a lot
    Harry

    • Hi Harry

      Thanks for your comment.

      Not all nominated occupations for a subclass 457 visa application require a skills assessment, registration or licensing. You may like to first check the requirement of your occupation by visiting Australian skills recognition information page and selecting your occupation. After that you can contact the relevant assessing authority or the relevant registration body in your state or territory for further information.

      The department does not give advice about skills assessments or registration and licensing requirements.

      Information on the subclass 457 visa can be found at http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/skilled-workers/sbs/
      Thanks for reading the Migration Blog.

  2. Dear Sir/Madam

    Just a query for subclass 189. I have a bachelor’s degree in Banking & Finance attained in 2006 and have been employed as an Accounts Officer ever since. I have been working towards completion of 9 units required by CPA for migration which led me to attain another degree in accounting in 2012. My CPA Migration assessment has been positive and IELTS in 7.5. My question is how many years of work experience can I claim?

    Request if you could advise.

    Thanks

    • Hi Sheetal

      It seems like you are talking about claiming work related experience for the points tested skilled migration Subclass 189 visa. You can claim points for skilled employment if that employment is in your nominated or closely related occupation and the employment occurred in the last ten years immediately before you apply for your subclass 189 visa.

      Under policy, closely related occupations are those occupations that fall within one unit group classified under Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO).

      The department does not give advice about skilled employment assessment of a particular occupation. Please contact the relevant assessing authority of your nominated occupation for advice.

      Thanks for reading the Migration Blog.

    • Hi Emily

      I am just concerned about the skills gained prior to and after attaining my qualification.

      Could you please enlighten more on that.

      Thanks

    • Dear Sheetal,

      All experiences are counted which are post qualification. So, since your degree in accounting is in the year 2012, therefore, you experience will start to be counted after 2012.

      Hope this helps.

    • Hi Sheetal and Amin

      Thank you for your comments.

      Here is some further information in relation to assessing employment claims:

      In making a decision to award points for skilled employment experience, case officers would take into consideration the opinion provided by the relevant assessing authority with regards to claims made by the applicant as to whether the skilled employment was at the level required for the occupation.

      You can approach your relevant assessing authority for further advice as how to obtain an opinion on your skilled employment.

      If the relevant assessing authority does not provide an opinion for specific periods of skilled employment, case officers should regard that for these periods, the assessing authority has not found that any employment claims were at the skilled level. It would then be for the case officer to consider any claims regarding employment experience for this period by the applicant against the evidence presented.

      Any claimed skilled employment will need to be demonstrated at the required skill level. For example, if the claims made by an applicant include periods of skilled employment as an accountant then the case officer is to be satisfied the applicant undertook their work at the appropriate skill level and not for example, as a book keeper which is a an occupation of a lower skill level.

      I hope this information is helpful.

      Thank you for reading the Migration Blog.

  3. Good article, especially as its hard to gain information on when a skills assessment is required.

  4. Great initiative by featuring basics of the well structured Immigration process, I guess, others countries must follow.

  5. Hi Emily
    In what circumstance will applicants be required by case officers to provide Points Advice issued by assessing authority? I heard that some people didn’t provide any Points Advice from assessing authority and still claim work experience points successfully, while some people with same occupations are required to provide Points Advice to claim work experience points. Does it depend on individual case officers? Thanks

    • Hi Dong

      Thank you for your comment.

      In assessing skilled employment, case officers would consider requirements set by the relevant assessing authority and their Points Advice if the supporting documentation provided by the applicant is insufficient to support their claim.

      I hope this answers your question.

      Thank you for reading the Migration Blog.

      Cheers

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